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Nuggets of Knowledge: December 2015

By December 30, 2015Nuggets of Knowledge

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In this, the last NOKlist of 2015, the whole team comes back together to offer you their chosen Nuggets of Knowledge. Just in case you’d forgotten how diverse that can be, here’s a little sampling of what’s on offer: reflections on both the ways of working and the joys (and miseries) of working, thoughts on the evolution of marketing in all its aspects, predictions for the future, and a defense of weirdness.

So, here you are. One last treat from the Mack Web team this year. Enjoy it and look forward to more great addition to the NOKlist archive in 2016!


Ann’s Pick

The August Open Compensation Model for Self-Managed Organizations

by August

Ann

Ann

I’m completely fascinated by the way organizations are operating these days – remote employees, flexible work schedules, self-managed teams – I love watching the way we’re evolving the way we view “work” and the “jobs” that we get paid for. In particular I find the changes in compensation incredibly interesting. Buffer really kicked things off with their Open Salaries policy a couple of years ago. And now August is bringing their Compensation Model out into the public for everyone to have access to.

I love this post because it walks you through their thoughts and how they landed where they did. I adore their team-oriented mindset about compensation. Innovation and transparency, for the win.

Read the post


Ayelet’s Pick

Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

by Kim Scott

Ayelet

Ayelet

Kim’s advice in this article is relevant to everyone who gives feedback. Whether you use this advice to give better feedback to your spouse, your friend, your direct report, or your co-worker, giving feedback to help someone improve is important. Radical candor when giving feedback is about caring personally about the person while also challenging her/him directly. It battles natural tendencies toward being insincere, shying away from giving direct feedback, being aggressive, or being overly empathetic. This is well worth a watch or a read!

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Beth’s Pick

Purpose is the New Bottom Line

by Casey Gerald

Mack

Beth

In this 20-minute talk on the topic of “revolution” hosted by Creative Mornings in NYC, Casey Gerald talks about purpose in work. “It’s not the what or the how. It’s the why that sparks the revolution,” he says.

He talks about the New Playbook for Change, which has three rules.

  1. The hierarchy is dead.
  2. We’re all entrepreneurs now.
  3. Purpose is the new bottom line.

Casey is the co-founder and CEO of MBAs Across America, a national movement of MBAs and entrepreneurs working together to revitalize America. And he’s a fabulous person to watch and listen to.

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Courtney’s Pick

State of Content Marketing 2016: The Tipping Point

by Shane Snow

Courtney

Courtney

The obvious value of this post is in the data and predictions it presents about the past and future of content marketing. (To the surprise of exactly no one, content will be taking over the world, if it hasn’t already). But what’s really interesting is reading between the lines for the follow-on effects of the digital and cultural environment in which content so flourishes: the way it’s changing internal corporate structures, the things you have to measure to understand success. It’s a chicken-egg question, really. Did content change the world or is the world changing content?

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Mack’s Pick

5 Lessons for Entrepreneurs

by Ian Lurie

Mack

Mack

It’s not so easy, this ‘running a business’ stuff. Most of the time it’s pretty unrelenting, thankless, and just plain hard. There’s a lot of days when I want to quit, but for some reason, I don’t.

Ian Lurie unfolds 5 lessons for entrepreneurs that he’s learned over the 19 years that he’s been running his business. I love this post for the candor, the transparency, and most of all, the humor. For those of you who are running a business or are thinking about it, read this. It’s everything you need to know about why entrepreneurs both hate and love their work, but would never, ever quit.

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Mike’s Pick

Twenty predictions for the next 20 years

By Robert Safian

Mike

Mike

It’s incredible to reflect on the last 20 years and see how fast we’ve evolved. Now fast forward and think about what the next 20 years will look like. With almost 3 billion people having broadband, we’ve never been more connected as a society. As Hans Vestberg puts it in this article, “our imagination is our limitation”. Take a sneak peek at what is predicted to happen over the next 20 years.

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Nat’s Pick

UX Design in 2016: From Websites to Web Services

by Jerry CAO

Nat

Nat

Jerry Cao addresses the shrinking gap between web design and UX design, and offers examples (such as Pelican Books “Penguin Reader” or Volkswagon’s car customization tool) to illustrate why you should 1) determine the service that’s best suited for your user, and then 2) design the technology accordingly. It’s definitely worth a read to help you think about ways to improve your website experience. Plus, there are 3 practical takeaways at the end of the post to help you get started.

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Olivia’s Pick

Know why: How to beat marketing survivorship bias

By Ian Lurie

Olivia

Olivia

Why does marketing advice suck?

That question – which you know you’ve asked – is what this post by Ian Lurie answers both brilliantly and humorously. If you, like we all do, love tactical marketing posts and marketing success stories, this is a must-read. It explains why people get into trouble when they try to emulate techniques or templates that have worked well for other marketers: we focus on those tactics only in the context of their successes, not their failures, and in doing so, we obsess over the what (the tactics themselves), rather than the why (all the other foundational pieces or circumstances that made those tactics work). I love this post because it’s a great look into our psychological biases and a reminder to ask more intelligent questions when we read. (Also, it explains the problem with infographics, and as someone who had enough of the infographic obsession approximately 2 years ago, I appreciate this.)

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Rae’s Pick

One is Greater Than Zero

by Gary Vaynerchuk

Rae


Rae

I can’t help but feel inspired the energy and passion that Gary puts into his videos about hustle and drive. In this video, the concept of 1>0 really reinforces the belief that no opportunity is too small. It only take getting your message heard by the right person at the right time once for there to be a serendipitous success story. Don’t judge the opportunity based on perception, the size of the audience, or who you think may or may not receive your message. Have the humility to do the work and be patient when you’re climbing your way to the top. Invest in your community and your audience and you never know where they might take you or who they have the power to expose you to. Your reach will only go as far as you push it and you have to start somewhere, 1>0.

Watch the video


Rebecca’s Pick

Why being weird is your best creative trait

by Jory MacKay

Rebecca

Rebecca

As someone whose livelihood depends on dreaming up new ideas, I definitely enjoy skirting the boundaries of normalcy, which sometimes is met by an eye roll or two. But the point of this post by Jory MacKay isn’t that we should be weird just for weird’s sake. It’s to “find a balance between familiar & controversial” – because that’s when others will start to take notice.

If you struggle with embracing the weirder ideas that are presented to you, this post will provide the reasoning you need to consider that risky notion and resist that eye roll. And if you’re weird and you know it, you’ll learn how to harness that trait for good and not for evil.

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Nuggets of Knowledge April 2014