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Nuggets of Knowledge: October 2015

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Something about falling leaves and shorter days must inspire sideways thinking because every article chosen for the October NOKlist is about taking a new perspective on an everyday topic, whether it’s approaching a specific project or reconsidering the way you work.

And since we also share our perspective on the issues presented, you get two new perspectives for the price of one.

You’re welcome.

For other deep thoughts, check out our Nuggets of Knowledge archive. Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: September 2015

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With the onset of fall comes a natural tendency towards introspection and reflection. (Alternatively known as pouting out the window and bemoaning the gray weather). This month’s NOKlist is no different. We have, for your autumnal delectation, thoughts on productivity, the intersection of fashion and sustainability and gauging for authenticity, waging a blitzkreig war on your brain, why photos of wild horses beat out kitten gifs, and the nature of personal leadership.
Also, there’s a Wonder Woman cake. Just for the funny.

Check it out.

And, if you’re eager for more, check out our NOKlist archive, too. Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: August 2015

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August is Big Picture Month for the Mack Web NOKlist. This month’s Nuggets of Knowledge are about looking at how things work together: how all things matter for the ultimate good of your brand, how to balance priorities and how to keep ideas alive beyond the moment, how to plan for the future of your designs and how to imagine the Future in all its glory. All fitting topics as summer draws to a close and we all prepare to head back to the grind.

There are also pandas.

If that’s not enough Mack Web amazingness for you, check out our previous issues of the NOKlist in the archive.

Read on to the pandas and perspective! Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: July 2015

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July is an introspective month for Mack Web. This month’s Nuggets of Knowledge includes musings on the nature of the web (and society), the quest for inspiration, the benefits of human connection, making bold decisions, and the pursuit of inner light.

Deep stuff.

Or maybe the heat is affecting our brains. Who can say, really?

Either way, we’ve got some great thoughts for you this month and, if you’re itching for something to do, check out our NOKlist archive. Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: June 2015

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Mack Web is now Genuinely. Learn more.

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Summer’s here! You know what that means?

Yep, it’s too hot for fancy intros. NOKlist, guys, chock full of social media savvy, productivity tips, methods for overcoming the fear of failure, and enduring through difficulty goodness. You know the drill.

(If you don’t know the drill, check out the Nuggets of Knowledge archive. You’re smart. You’ll pick it up quickly.) Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: May 2015

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Mack Web is now Genuinely. Learn more.

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It’s a different month from last month, which can only mean one thing: NOKlist time. (Actually, it could probably mean more than one thing. Like bills and calendar pages and maybe a haircut. But this is the thing that matters right now.)

May’s Nuggets of Knowledge is one for both self-reflection and helpful tips. New approaches to strategy and brand voice, musings on the interaction of art and technology and bank robbers, and thoughts on learning and on working: these all lie before you. Exciting, right?

(And if you’d like to check out previous NOKlists, we’ve got a whole Nuggets of Knowledge archive.) Read More

Nuggets of Knowledge: April 2015

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Mack Web is now Genuinely. Learn more.

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Systems and design, quitting and creativity, a scathing denunciation of dickheads – such a collection of introspection, practical advice, geekery, and judiciously applied profanity can only mean one thing. That’s right, friends. It’s NOKlist time.

(If you’ve never had the pleasure of reading the Nuggets of Knowledge our team collects, check out the NOKlist archive.) Read More

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Nuggets of Knowledge: March 2015

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In accordance with our new NOKlist protocol, the other half of the team speaks! And as you can expect from any cross-section of the Mack Web team, we’ve got a mixed bunch of food-for-thought for your noggins today.

Obsession and follow-through, integrated marketing and dubious GIFs, the joys and perils of being the New Kid: we like to keep you guessing.

(If you’re at all familiar with our past NOKlists, you’re well accustomed to such an eclectic mix. If you’re new, you’re in for a treat.)

So sit back and enjoy Nuggets of Knowledge, March 2015 edition. You won’t regret it.

(Well, you probably won’t regret it … allowing for context. If you miss the birth of your first child or the signs of an impending tiger attack because you were completely engrossed in our NOKlist, you might regret it. Maybe.)


Rebecca’s Pick

The Idea Person

by Julie Zhuo

Rebecca

Rebecca

I have a deep-buried secret that I’ve never admitted to anyone but my husband and a trusted few, for I felt it would bring shame upon my kind and kin.

I’ve never completed all five seasons of Chuck.

You see, at around season 2, watching this should-have-been-my-favorite-TV-show got more difficult. I had to endure a whole lot of love angst and an insecure leading man before getting to the good spy stuff. At that time in my life, Chuck was a good idea, but I just didn’t have what it took to follow through to the end.

There’s a lesson to be learned here, and Julie Zhuo talks all about it in her recent post about the follow-through person. (There’s no mention of Chuck, but she does mention a lotus and Final Fantasy.) Yet she doesn’t just talk about the follow-through person – she celebrates her.

We are indeed a culture that celebrates the idea person. But what about the ones who endure through the muck and mire of research, planning, revisions, revisions, revisions … to finally emerge at the end with a fully realized idea? As part of a great team of muck and mire sloggers, I nearly wept after reading Julie Zhuo’s post. I didn’t feel like I was laying face-down in the trenches. I felt hands-raised-in-the-air celebrated.

Lesson: “Nothing thrills like the promise of a good idea. Nothing happens without the follow-through.”

Life application: T minus 24 episodes

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Mike’s Pick

A True Goal Needs to Become an Obsession

by Joe Desena

Mike

Mike

When it comes to setting the bar and accomplishing things in life, I’ve always admired those that cross the line of liking something to becoming utterly obsessed. It’s one thing to run a marathon, which is on my list, but it’s another thing to be an ultramarathon runner. As you’ll see in this article, Michael Wardian was obsessed with being the fastest person to run a 50k.

It takes that kind of determination to be successful; OK, maybe not as crazy as Michael Wardian got, but you get my point. In their lives and careers, too many people fail to set their goals high enough or quit before they get there. I like the quote in this article that states, “People cheer at the starting and the finish line. The middle miles need mental toughness.”

And that’s very true, especially for a business. Starting a business is always shiny in the beginning and usually gets tough in the middle. Personally, the middle miles are what excite me the most about coming to work everyday. Those are the miles where you learn, test, build, and reflect on a daily basis. And all the skills you build will serve you well beyond the finish line. Because if you think about it, the finish line isn’t really the end, it’s the start of something new. A new challenge, a new record, a new experience that ultimately shape who you are today.

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Courtney’s Pick

The GIF of Gab: The Mundane Politics of Animated Images

by Megan Garber

Courtney

Courtney

It’s not a long article and it’s not even terribly deep: a brief commentary on the falling barriers between political media and PR. It’s also not surprising that even the House Judiciary Committee – an important body that goes largely unheeded by most of the population that falls outside the Beltway – is resorting to GIFs these days to communicate its point.

But two interesting things struck me as I was perusing the Committee’s offering.

Now, I love a good GIF as much as the next person (there’s one of llama rejection that I find particularly delightful and I have a whole collection of famous people doing stupid dance moves that I like to circulate when I feel the office environment is becoming oppressive). But no one has ever claimed them as a particularly high-brow form of communication. Nevertheless, it turns out, it is possible to do a GIF post very badly indeed. All respect to the Committee, but…this is clearly not their media department’s forte. What I actually took away from that realization though is: if you can tell that something has been done poorly, that means that you can also recognize when it has been done well. I tend to be a strictly-words kinda girl for effective communication, so it was a reminder to think outside my comfort zone (and other mangled cliches).

On a related and almost contradictory note, the second thing that struck me reading this article was that all this talk we’ve been talking about ensuring everything your marketing does is genuine and authentic and comes from the core of who you are – it’s really, actually true. Not that I doubted it, but I saw it in action in two ways. First, you can’t count on flashy gimmicks to set you apart: everyone is using them. (Like, everyone.) Second, I have actually never been less impressed with the House Judiciary Committee. Their struggle to be relevant has actually just made them look like a bunch of suits desperately trying to ‘be chill, dudes.’ In ceding the gravitas and general self-importance that one expects from an elite group of our governing body, they’ve actually torpedoed what they were trying to say.

In short, it’s important to tailor your message to your audience. Absolutely. But you should do it without losing your grasp on who you are and what makes you powerful.

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Beth’s Pick

The First 90 Days: Your Road Map for Success at a New Job

By Scott McDowell

Beth

Beth

I’ve recently joined Mack Web as the Content Strategist. It’s a new role for them and a new role for me. Prior to this, I spent 8 1/2 years as the director of communications for the alumni association of a large, public, land-grant institution.

Now that I am in a totally new industry, a small office space, and working with a team of 10 (instead of hundreds), I am in the backseat, watching out the window, wondering and waiting. It’s a strange place to be. I’m accustomed to being the driver – or at least the navigator – and right now I’m a passenger, listening and watching and taking it all in.

This article from Scott McDowell, published at 99U, is a re-cap of The First 90 Days by Michael Watkins, and gives a five-step roadmap for surviving and succeeding in a new job. These 5 steps are a great guide for tempering your urge to dive in, building your relationships with new co-workers, and clarifying expectations and needs from the boss.

I’m glad I’ve done a few of the steps – I could improve on some of the others – and it’s helpful to know that it’s common to feel inept and anxious to jump in. So, though it’s difficult, I shall sit down, buckle up, and listen hard. It won’t be long, I’m sure, before the lay of the land becomes clear and I can start to navigate the path.

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Ann’s Pick

6 Creative Ways to Integrate Social Media and Email Marketing

by Jimmy Daly

Ann

Ann

It’s no secret that I heart the guys over at Vero. Jimmy & Chris are a) super smart b) authentic & transparent and c) extra friendly and approachable. I mean, does it get much better than that?

That’s why I was pleasantly surprised to see this Buffer article was written by none other than Jimmy Daly from Vero.

Speaking of people I heart, our very own Ayelet is definitely at the tip top of that list. And this article is all about our two worlds colliding – social & email. If you haven’t heard it a hundred times yet, we’re all about the integrated experience here at Mack Web. Our fearless leader pushes us to avoid the silos of our individual channels. All of our strategies are about using the channels together to accomplish big goals for our clients.

Since the path to conversion isn’t always as linear as we’d like it to be, we create the experience everywhere – before, during, and after conversion. And that’s right where this post from Jimmy comes in handy. He presents six tactics for integrating your social & email channels so the experience carries seamlessly between the two.

This post is super practical with screen shots walking you through every step. So, give it a read and plan afternoon tea date with your social & community strategist (or coffee or beer with whatever role your social/email counterpart fills).

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Nuggets of Knowledge April 2014

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Nuggets of Knowledge: February 2015

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Most of you know the drill for Nuggets of Knowledge by now: we read a whole lot of stuff, choose the very best of it to share with you, add our unique voices to the commentary, and leave you in peace to enjoy our brilliance and the brilliance of those we admire. It’s a good system. It works.

Which is why, of course, we’ve decided to change it up a bit. The team is growing and rather than overwhelm you with so much monthly genius, we’ve decided to split it up a little. So this month, you’ll be hearing from half the team. The other half will share next month. And so on and so forth. Really, we’re just trying to keep your brains from exploding with all the amazing-ness that we have to share.

So dive right into this month’s NOKlist, rife with office and team dynamics, data on user behavior, and some great tips for personal information. Plus our shining faces.

Well, half of our shining faces.

Er, that is…the shining faces of half our team. No faces were halved in the making of this NOKlist. We swear.

Nor any other NOKlist for that matter. Seriously, check out our NOKlist archive. All faces, entirely intact.


Rebecca’s Pick

Overwhelmed? Simplify Complex Tasks with a List

by Tanner Christensen

Rebecca

Rebecca

This article is dedicated to anyone who has ever had too much to do. If that’s not you, then please back away slowly lest you incur the wrath of the overwhelmed.

For the rest of us, we can rein in those tasks that never seem to get done because they seem just too darn big to start. And it all starts with the art of list making.

Tanner Christensen helps us understand that complexity can in fact be the enemy of accomplishment. But perhaps all you need is a list to save the day.

Let’s start with this one:

1. Identify that task that, for some reason, you don’t want to do. Instead you keep binge-watching Scrubs because Netflix told you they were going to remove it and yet you were only three-fourths of the way through the nine-season series, but then after weeks of watching 3-5 episodes a day they took off that warning (lying bastards).

2. Read this article.

3. Make your list.

4. Bask in your success.

5. Finish Scrubs at a reasonable cadence and let your husband watch his Nova documentaries for crying out loud.

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Olivia’s Pick

Why Your Team Needs Rookies

by Liz Wiseman

Olivia

Olivia

“I have no idea what I’m doing, but I know I’m doing it really well.” – Andy Dwyer, Parks and Rec (also me, multiple occasions)

Before I read this article, I didn’t think being a rookie was an awful thing necessarily, but I definitely didn’t think it was desirable.

Career wise (and life wise), it seems like being an expert or a veteran, with experience and knowledge on your side, is advantageous to being a rookie, who has lots to learn (and inevitably lots of mistakes to make), yes?

This article shows you why that’s not totally true. It explains why rookies one, are underestimated, and two, are something a team needs. I’ll let you discover the specific reasons, but think an eagerness to learn and experiment, a willingness to explore unconventional options, and an aptness for just jumping in and doing the dang thing. In fact, having a knowledge or skills gap can be hugely advantageous. (Counterintuitive, right? But this idea actually makes a lot of sense once you read about it.)

I especially liked this because in an industry like, say, integrated marketing, things change quickly, so there’s a good chance that sometimes, you’ll feel like a rookie even if you’ve been around for a while. Sometimes I find this slightly frustrating, but it turns out that having that rookie mindset is valuable. And, bonus: anyone can adopt it, regardless of their age or career.

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Nat’s Pick

6 things we learned from website use in 2014

by Keir Gibson and Gavin Holland

Nat

Nat

As a designer, I find data helpful. It helps me figure out how my design is going to address user needs, behaviours, and small improvements needed in a website’s design. This, of course, is done by looking at data which is unique to said website.

But you know what else I’ve realized? It’s also crucial to stay up-to-date on larger trends and behaviours, pulled from a larger pool of data. Looking at a larger sampling of data helps me understand the wider themes of user behaviours, which in turn helps me become a better designer (rather than an out-dated one). That’s why I’m sharing this post by Keir Gibson and Gavin Holland for this month’s NOKlist. Gibson and Holland looked at data from 2014 and analyzed usage-related stats from more than 25 sites, and came up with some interesting findings.

They touch on 6 key things:

1. Device trends
2. Browser trends
3. Top traffic-driving channels
4. Social network referrals
5. Landing pages
6. User behaviour

You don’t have to be a designer to find this data useful. If you’re an online marketer, a business owner, or just someone interested in user behaviour from 2014, then check this article out and see what you learn.

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Mack’s Pick

Why Yammer Believes the Traditional Engineering Structure is Dead

By Kris Gale, VP of Engineering at Yammer

Mack

Mack

As Mack Web continues to grow, I seek insight that will help us better structure our team for efficiency, balance, and better serving our clients while staying true to our responsive nature and extremely collaborative culture. Although we are not a team of engineers, there are many parallels in Kris’ post that provide food for thought as the Mack Web team increases in size.

The biggest realization I had while reading Kris’ post was from this piece:

“If you’ve broken up work…where the top-level managers have to divide tasks and then delegate them, you’re doing it wrong. If the individual who’s actually implementing the code spots something that’s wrong with the spec, he or she has to propose a change all the way up the ladder, which then has to filter back down. It’s a blocking process and will bring product development to a halt. Meanwhile, the other engineers in different parts of the organization will see this as churn since they’re not working closely with the engineer who proposed the change. They won’t understand the rationale behind the revision itself.”

Even when you’re a small company, it’s really easy to over-think structure and put roadblocks where they don’t belong. As we work to identify the quickest way to delegate tasks throughout the team and spend more time on action and less time on planning, this post provides some great advice.

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Ayelet’s Pick

Madam C.E.O., Get Me a Coffee

by Adam Grant & Sheryl Sandberg

Ayelet

Ayelet

What?! A departure from my regular posts in our Nuggets of Knowledge about analytics, social media, and community?! Am I feeling alright? Yes, I feel fine and yes, I am taking a break from those wonderful topics this month. This article about women in the workplace really spoke to me. Because although I now work in an office of mainly women, I – like most women who have been in the workplace for any length of time – have faced these issues, even though we may not realize them explicitly or we’ve talked ourselves out of recognizing what exactly is going on.

Adam Grant and Sheryl Sandberg write about how women work and how that style can affect the opportunities they get offered at work. This article isn’t just great for other women to read; it is a must for everyone to read. It doesn’t male bash and there’s real research behind what they say. Adam and Sheryl (we’re on a first-name basis now) stir up a hopeful discussion on how the current situation for women in the workplace can be reversed. Please check it out and pass it on.

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Nuggets of Knowledge April 2014

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Nuggets of Knowledge: January 2015

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We are happy to usher in 2015 with the first NOKlist of the year. And we’re off to an exciting start with good brand advice, a content process, a little bit of nostalgia, and a whole lot of Mayhem. Not to mention two – yep, count ‘em, two – excellent articles on optimizing your email campaigns.

So crack open that bottle of champagne you’ve been hoarding from your New Year’s celebrations and settle in to enjoy Mack Web’s Nuggets of Knowledge, January edition.

(And, just in case that’s not enough Nuggets for you, check out the compendium of last year’s NOKlists, too.)


Rebecca’s Pick

Allstate’s Mayhem Is Back and He’s Watching Your Social Media Profiles

by Ashley Rodriguez

Rebecca

Rebecca

I love Mayhem. I don’t mean that I embrace needless or willful damage or violence (that’s reserved just for the movies). I mean Allstate’s self-made archenemy. He’s the Khan to their Captain Kirk. He’s the Sauron to their noble Hobbitses. He’s the Joker to their Batman.

And he’s looking for you … on social.

In her recent post, Ashley Rodriguez provides an overview of Allstate’s latest campaign, and in the process she shines a Bat-Signal on a segment of thieves that many of us don’t think about when we’re posting online: social savvy burglars.

What I adore about this campaign is that I can actually adore it, even though I’m not an Allstate customer. Allstate’s message is meant for everyone as a PSA and for the common good – going beyond just brand promotion. That means that even people like me – an eternal loyalist to my current insurance provider – will gladly share this content with anyone who will listen (or read, or tweet, or whatever).

There’s a crucial lesson to be learned here, if it hasn’t been learned already: Consumers are not blind – we know there’s a brand attached to this content. But if it’s quality? Then we’ll enthusiastically (and possibly heroically) share it for you.

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Olivia’s Pick

10 Ways We Come Up With 15+ Blog Ideas Each Week

by Alex Turnbull

Olivia

Olivia

I have a major marketing/strategy/content crush (which, yes, is a thing I just made up) on Groove. Their posts are always excellent and I especially like this one about how to come up with blog post ideas.

If you’ve been following Groove at all over the past year, you know that they are a case study in how to do content marketing right. This post lets you in on how they come up with (get this) more ideas than they have time to write about. If you have ever struggled to come up with a blog post idea or if that is your very struggle right now, having a surplus of ideas probably sounds like bliss. The best part about the detailed look into the system that Groove uses is that you can very easily take parts of it (or the whole darn thing) and apply it to your blog/business.

And, bonus, the tactics in this post can do a lot more than help you come up with blog post topics. They’ll also help you understand your customers, the communities that they’re part of, and how they use your product.

If you’re looking for a model of how to be transparent or how to share your experiences in a way that provides value to your readers (this idea of value is a common thread that runs through this whole post) or if you need a gentle, loving nudge to take some risks and write about them, I’d check this out.

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Nat’s Pick

5 A/B Tests You Should Be Running on Your Landing Page Opt-In Forms

by Giles Thomas

Nat

Nat

Opt-in forms play an important part in the conversion process. Filling out a form is often the final step a user takes to convert, which is why we need to roll up our sleeves and ensure our opt-in forms are being all that an opt-in form can be.

But what sort of tests do you run to discover if your opt-in form could be better? This is where Giles Thomas and his post about A/B testing opt-in forms come into play. Thomas offers up 5 tests we can – and should – run on our opt-in forms. After all, every audience is unique, so you’re not going to find what works best for your users until you start testing things out.

One key piece of this blog post (and why I feel it’s “Nuggets worthy”) is that it doesn’t just give you A/B testing ideas, but it also includes a case study for each test. The case studies are awesome because you can see the A/B variations that were tested against one another and the results that ensued. I hope this post gets you excited about A/B testing and helps you make great adjustments to your opt-in forms for better conversion rates. Happy testing!

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Mike’s Pick

How You Can Build a Meaningful Brand

By Hannah Smith

Mike

Mike

I can’t stop thinking about the stat I read in Hannah Smith’s recent Moz post: “In Europe and the US, consumers would not care if 92% of brands ceased to exist.” Wow, tough crowd. What is it that makes the remaining 8% so special?

I think Hannah nailed it on the head with her list of three types of enduring brands:

1. Brands that have opportunities to delight customers (social, customer service, on the street)
2. Brands that give people the ability to define themselves to others
3. Brands that stand for something above and beyond their products or services

For me, the best example of this is Patagonia. They continue to delight me with their new products, retail experience, breathtaking photography and their continued determination to make a difference. And I see Hannah’s point about being able to define yourself with the company. When I see someone wearing a Patagonia product, I feel like I know something more about that person. That moment of recognition has been fostered by the brand ideals that Patagonia has been communicating all along. Anyone can make a jacket, but I look at that jacket and I see forest conservation and care for the environment and sustainable production. I see meaning behind the product. Brands that do this well will own the 8 percent.

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Mack’s Pick

Forget About Setting Goals. Focus on This Instead

By James Clear

Mack

Mack

In this quantitative, ROI-hungry world of marketing, not only do goals give us something to strive for, they also give us something against which to measure progress. What I love about this post from James Clear is that he’s thinking differently about goals and putting the focus on the process, not the result.

“When you’re working toward a goal, you are essentially saying, ‘I’m not good enough yet, but I will be when I reach my goal.’”

The problem with this mindset is that you’re teaching yourself to always put happiness and success off until the next milestone is achieved. ‘Once I reach my goal, then I’ll be happy. Once I achieve my goal, then I’ll be successful.'”

Working towards achieving anything is a process. This post is a gentle reminder that the value and satisfaction of your efforts isn’t really in reaching the goal, but rather what is experienced and learned along the way. I love the emphasis on the building blocks and all of the tiny pieces you’re putting into place along your journey that happen to be just as important as the end goal itself.

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Courtney’s Pick

Google – Year in Search 2014

by Google

Courtney

Courtney

There’s no better way to start off the year than by looking over the year gone by. Google’s annual summary of their trending searches gives clear and interesting insight into the topics that were really on people’s minds last year. (Plus, it makes for a goosebumpingly inspirational video.) Everything from hoverboards to ebola to comets to the Olympics: Google tells us both the timely topics of 2014 and reminds us of the enduring truths of humankind. We love and we worry and we laugh and we wonder and we cheer and we idolize and we fight and we hope.

And not to cheapen the moment, but those are also the things we marketers need to remember when we fret about how to capture the audience, how to keep them engaged, how to be relevant. Because whether the Thing of the Day is a boy in a funny hat or a girl with a pack of dragons, the underlying emotions remain the same.

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Ayelet’s Pick

Building Consumer Awareness: How to Talk to People Who Don’t Know They Need You

by Bridget Randolph

Ayelet

Ayelet

As marketers who live & breathe brand, it’s easy for us to fall into the trap of thinking everyone gets the brand and the problem a given product or service solves. This article is a great reminder that 1) normal people may not even know they have a problem, 2) they may not know that there’s a doodad or service that can solve that problem, and 3) they may not even know how to start looking for that doodad or service because they don’t even know they have a problem.

So how do you make them care? Get to the heart of that and you’re golden. This post by Bridget Randolph will get you on the right path, my friends.

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Ann’s Pick

5 Things You Need to Know Before You Write a Word of Email Opt-In Copy

by Megan Hannay

Ann

Ann

As a devoted reader of this NOKlist, you were looking for another article with five items related to opt-in landing pages, right? Good, I knew you were. That’s why I’ve got your back. (If you’re skimming this list and missed the first article with five items related to opt-in landing pages, scroll up to Nat’s pick for this month.)

Unbounce’s list of 5 Things You Need to Know Before You Write a Word of Email Opt-In Copy is a great precursor to the post Nat shared. It’s like the little diving board you want to jump off of before you go to the high dive. (And if you already have some email opt-in copy written, no worries, just use the A/B guide hand-in-hand with this list of questions to test out all the things. You’ll have the most super optimized opt-in page in all of the land.)

Something to note about this article: the first question is about goals. It always starts with goals. Figure that stuff out, then move forward from there. Whether optimizing copy or A/B testing visual design, figure out your goals first. But, I do like this article for more than the fact that it echoes our own mantra. It’s also super user-focused and has lots of great tips for looking at existing data. Even if you don’t have any data from an email service provider (yet…follow this path and you will soon), there are lots of things you can look at and take into consideration when figuring out what your opt-in copy should say. Check out this list of questions (and Nat’s list too), test some things, and then let us know what results you find.

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Nuggets of Knowledge April 2014